Thursday, July 30, 2009

Interview with Julie Kraut!

Julie Kraut, author of this summer's Slept Away and co-author of Hot Mess, took some time out for a FNC mini-interview. Julie's one of the funniest writers we know -- she's one of CollegeHumor's few female contributors, and she put that zany sense of humor into each page of Slept Away. Check out the interview below for Julie's thoughts on characters who don't wear pants, being on the other side of the publishing world, and why her writing is like pepper jack cheese.

About Slept Away: Laney Parker is a city girl through and through. For her,
summertime means stepping out of her itchy gray school uniform and into a season of tanning at rooftop swimming pools, brunching at sidewalk cafes, and—as soon as the parents leave for the Hamptons—partying at her classmates’ apartments. 
But this summer Laney’s mother has other plans for Laney. It’s called Camp Timber Trails and rustic doesn’t even begin to describe the un-air-conditioned log cabin nightmare. Laney is way out of her element—the in-crowd is anything but cool, popularity seems to be determined by swimming skills, and the activities seem more like boot camp than summer camp.
Splattered with tie dye fall out, stripped of her cell, and going through Diet Coke withdrawal, Laney is barely hanging on. Being declared the biggest loser of the bunk is one thing, but when she realizes her summer crush is untouchably uncrushable in the real world, she starts to wonder, can 
camp cool possibly translate to cool cool?
Summer camp might just turn this city girl’s world upside down! 

What was your creation process for Slept Away? Meaning, what was the original nugget that inspired the books – the characters, the setting, a certain scene or line of dialogue, the plot? How did it develop/evolve from there?
Because I still want a spot at the Thanksgiving dinner table, I won’t go into too much detail about this, but during a trip home, I found myself yelling down the stairs, “I swear I’m like the only person in this family who wears pants on a regular basis.”  And then I thought to myself, “What a ridiculous thing to say. I want the main character in my next book to say that.”  And that really was the little kernel of the idea that started the book. I outlined my ideas for Laney and her mother and not-at-all-step-father and made sure that the two adults never wore pants.

After I laid out this little trifecta of pantsless family dysfunction, it felt like the perfect set up for sending Laney to camp. After ten years (No wait, more—ah, when did I get this old?) of reminiscing about my summers at camp, I was ready to step back and somehow turn my collection of memories into a story.  While Slept Away isn’t the love letter to sleep away camp I’d write if I were telling my own story, writing the book still allowed me to rehash many of my summer experiences and had the added bonus of prompting me to Facebook stalk some of my former camp friends and get in touch.
Slept Away includes many pop culture references and current slang. How did you get the teen voice right?
When people used to ask me this question, I’d say something like, “You know how we all have that inner teenager that we hide when we’re faking being adults?  Well, I just stop faking when I write.”  But then I realized that no one ever answered, “Yeah, I totally know what you mean.”  So, maybe everyone else isn’t faking this adult thing, huh? Anyway, I am and that’s what I do and how I get the teen voice.
What do you see as your greatest strength and your greatest weakness as a writer?
Not sure what my greatest of each is.  But here’s my top three for both:
My weaknesses: Endings
Author photos
My strengths: Deadlines
You’ve also been on the other side of the publishing world, working for Random House. How has the knowledge you gained from that helped you as a writer?
Being on “the other side of the desk” is such a different experience from working at a publishing house. Still, I was really surprised by how new everything felt publishing my own book when I’d been in the industry for a few years. There’s so much more emotion involved when it’s your book and that can change your perspective a lot. That being said, understanding the business has helped in terms of managing expectations, anticipating the process, and digesting the sales and marketing information.
Lastly, you said in your website bio that you love cheese. If you could compare your writing style to a type of cheese, what would it be and why?
This might be one of my favorite interview questions of all time!  But also, kind of a toughie.  Picking just one cheese…hmmm…ok, I think I’ve got it. I’d like to think of my writing as fun reading with a line every page or two that’ll make you giggle to yourself. So, I guess I’d go with pepper jack.  It’s delicious all the way through with little nuggets of heat that make it even yummier.

Want more Julie? Check out her website and purchase Slept Away on Amazon!

Coming Soon...Interview with Lara Zeises!

FNC is excited to announce that in August we'll be posting an interview with author Lara Zeises, author of the recent release The Sweet Life of Stella Madison, available from Delacorte Press for Young Readers, as well as Bringing Up the Bones, Contents Under Pressure and Anyone But You, available from Laurel Leaf.  Lara's also been known to disguise herself as Lola Douglas, author of True Confessions of a Hollywood Starlet and More Confessions of a Hollywood Starlet, both available from Razorbill.  Lara was our favorite author from the SCBWI Poconos Conference--a self-proclaimed dork, she charmed us all with her down-to-earth attitude towards the book world, not to mention her awesome sense of humor.  You can find her online at the newly revamped Zeisgest--check it out, and a keep an eye out for her interview!

Monday, July 27, 2009

Even More Stalking Potential

Stalking us, stalking's all the same. Anyway just wanted to piggy back on our upcoming outings that Donna mentioned below...

You can also catch at least one if not all four of us :

September 8, Ellicott City MD Barnes and Noble, Richelle Mead's Blood Promise Tour

October 10, Exton PA, SCBWI Eastern PA Fall Philly Conference

Sunday, July 26, 2009

Author Stalkers!

Here at First Novels Club, we're determined to bring you up close and personal with some of the best new and established YA authors out there. As great as our interviews are (check out past Q & A sessions with Maria V. Snyder, Cara Lockwood, and Becca Fitzpatrick), the best way to both support and get to know a great author is by stalking them -- in person!

We'll be traveling around the tri-state area in upcoming months to check out these great authors, so come join us!

Jay Asher, Thirteen Reasons Why reading & signing
Friday, July 31st @ 7pm, Borders in Bridgewater, NJ

Lara Zeises, The Sweet Life of Stella Madison release party
Saturday, August 8th @ 2pm, Borders in Newark, DE

Julie Kraut, Slept Away reading & signing
Saturday, October 3rd @ 2pm, University of Pennsylvania Bookstore in Philadelphia, PA

Becca Fitzpatrick Interview

The FNC Presents an interview with...Becca Fitzpatrick, debut author of the upcoming novel, Hush, Hush! Read on to discover more about Becca, her hot upcoming release, awkward moments in biology, sex on the first page?!, the writing process, chipmunk love and more:-)

About Becca...

Becca Fitzpatrick grew up reading Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden with a flashlight under the covers. She graduated college with a degree in health, which she promptly abandoned for storytelling. When not writing, she's most likely prowling sale racks for reject shoes, running, or watching crime dramas on TV. HUSH, HUSH is her first novel and will be released by Simon and Schuster on October 13, 2009 (this feels like a long time from now)!

About Hush, Hush...

Falling in love was never so easy . . .or so deadly.

For Nora Grey, romance was not part of the plan. She's never been particularly attracted to the boys at her school, no matter how much her best friend, Vee, pushes them at her. Not until Patch came along. With his easy smile and eyes that seem to see inside her, Nora is drawn to him against her better judgment.

But after a series of terrifying encounters, Nora's not sure who to trust. Patch seems to be everywhere she is, and to know more about her than her closest friends. She can't decide whether she should fall into his arms or run and hide. And when she tries to seek some answers, she finds herself near a truth that is way more unsettling than anything Patch makes her feel.
For Nora is right in the middle of an ancient battle between the immortal and those that have fallen - and, when it comes to choosing sides, the wrong choice will cost her life.

Becca, thank you so much for taking the time out to talk with us!

1. What was your creation process for Hush, Hush? Meaning, what was the original nugget that inspired the book – the character, the story? How did it develop/evolve from there?

I started writing Hush, Hush six years ago, so it's hard for me to remember how everything unfolded. I'd just finished reading The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton and it brought up all kinds of memories from my own high school years. When I sat down to write Hush, Hush, my brain was juggling several of those memories, including a memory of sitting in tenth-grade biology and having my teacher ask me to name, in front of the entire class, characteristics I'd be attracted to in a mate. Talk about awkward! There's a very similar scene in Hush, Hush, and it was one of the first I wrote.

2. When in the process did you realize there would be more than one book? I know you have been working on the sequel, Crescendo. How did you outline the series, and did that affect the plot of the first book? And how many books will there be total?

Laughing, because I wasn't the one who decided there'd be more than one book. I wasn't thinking that far ahead – I just wanted to sell my book, dang it! So you can imagine how surprised and elated I was when my agent called to say Hush, Hush had sold...along with a sequel. My publisher, Simon & Schuster, saw a lot of potential for a series and gave me a two-book deal. I don't have the entire series planned out because I'm not sure how many books will be in the series, but I'll let you know when I do!

3. What were the most difficult and best parts of writing your first novel? How long did it take you to write from concept to outlining to completion to sending if off to agents?

Uncertainty was the most difficult part. Despite the huge amount of time and energy I was investing into Hush, Hush, I knew there was no guarantee it would ever be published. There were times when that was really hard to accept. More than once I had to take a deep breath and focus on the journey – the writing – more than the final outcome. If all Hush, Hush ever amounted to was a labor of love, a story for my eyes alone, so be it. The best part of writing Hush, Hush was spending time with characters I felt a real attachment to. I love all my characters, but Vee is probably my favorite. She never fails to make me snort (in a good way). As far as a time line, I started writing Hush, Hush in the fall of 2003, and seduced an agent into representing it just shy of five years later.

4. Can you tell us a little bit about how you created the characters of Nora and Patch?

In the early drafts of Hush, Hush, Nora was self-absorbed, selfish and sarcastic. Over the years, she evolved into an intelligent and almost cagey young woman, and I think her cageyness matches well with Patch's sexy reckless abandon. Patch, on the other hand, has changed very little from the early drafts. He was the ultimate bad boy from day one. He hasn't shed his arrogance, and probably never will. At least, I hope he doesn't! I'm often asked if Patch is based on someone I know, and here's my final answer. He's based on someone I used to know. And that's all I'm going to say about that!

5. Your opening to Hush, Hush immediately drew us in. What are your secrets to a great first five pages?

Sex. That's it. Just kidding! Both Hush, Hush and Crescendo open with Nora caught in an uncomfortable situation. As a voracious reader myself, I like to read opening pages that show a character in conflict. I love that wickedly foreboding feeling of sensing that the conflict will escalate into a full-blown crisis over the course of the book. Basically, stuff needs to be happening right away. Stuff happening is key!

6. Can you tell us a little about the creation of the play list for Hush, Hush? Did you listen to the songs as you wrote?

I can't listen to music while I write (it messes up my concentration), but I definitely plot to music. Most of my plotting takes place in the first hours of morning, when I'm out running. As I listen to my iPod, I try to envision whatever scene I plan to write later that day. Watching a scene unfold in my mind before I sit down to write helps me immensely.

7. What do you see as your greatest strength and your greatest weakness as a writer?

I'm very conscientious. I pay attention to detail. I don't send my writing to my agent or editor until I know it's the very best I can make it. My biggest weakness is my aversion to deadlines. Writers face deadlines all the time, but I often feel like deadlines conflict with my desire to send in only my best work. In a perfect world, I'd have an infinite amount of time to edit my writing (I can hear my editor laughing all the way from New York).

8. Can you briefly detail your journey to publication after finishing your first book? (Finding an agent, an editor, promoting the book, etc.)

I signed with agent Catherine Drayton in June 2008, spent the summer revising the story with her, and in September she submitted the story to several editors, Emily Meehan at Simon and Schuster among them. Emily was incredibly enthusiastic about the story, and I knew right away we were a great fit. In March 2009, I flew to New York to meet her for the first time, and while I was at dinner with her and my publisher, they agreed that the most important promotion I would ever do would be writing my next book. I've taken their advice to heart, and really focused my energy this year on making Crescendo a worthy sequel. Of course, interviews and guest blogs are a fun way to break up the intensity that comes with writing a book.

9. Which authors have inspired you the most?

Laurie Halse Anderson, Diana Gabaldon, Sandra Brown, Karen Joy Fowler, Laura Ingalls Wilder and Jane Austen.

10. What non-literary thing inspires you to write?

Just being alive inspires me to write. I've got one shot at this life, and I should fill it with the things I love. It really is as simple as that.

11. You are stranded on a deserted island for five years. What five books would you want with you?

Anne of Green Gables, Pride and Prejudice, The Phantom of the Opera, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and Wilderness Survival.

12. You are waiting for your first novel Hush, Hush to come out. It’s already getting SERIOUS buzz online and will debut in over 13 countries. That is amazing! What would you like to accomplish next?

I'd love to run a mile in under six minutes again.

13. Ok fess up, which of the Chipmunks are you secretly in love with? Alvin, Simon, or Theodore?

Oooh, good question. As a girl, I had a huge crush on Alvin. Anymore, I'd probably have to go with Simon. Smart is sexy!

Hehe, we hope you enjoyed the interview as much we did. For more information on Becca Fitzpatrick and Hush, Hush check out

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Cara Lockwood Interview

The FNC is thrilled to present an interview with Cara Lockwood. Cara is the USA Today bestselling author of I Do (But I Don't), I Did (But I Wouldn't Now), and the Bard Academy Series.

Read on to discover Cara's dream school, her life as a lit nerd, her connections to MTV and Lifetime, which books she'd take to a deserted island and bringing romantic bad boys back to life.

1. What was your creation process for the Bard Academy series? Meaning, what was the original nugget that inspired the books – the character, the academy, the teachers, Heathcliff…? How did it develop/evolve from there?

My agent was the one who suggested I try writing young adult books. In high school, I was what you would call a “lit nerd” – I loved reading, especially the classics. English was my favorite class by far. I started thinking about what would I have liked to read as a teen, and that’s where I came up with the idea of Bard Academy. It might have some spooky elements, but all in all, it’s my dream school.

I really liked the idea of giving Heathcliff a second chance. I know he turns into quite a villain in Wuthering Heights, but I always thought he could’ve been redeemed. He has some very good qualities, too, like being incredibly loyal and tough. That makes him a pretty good action hero, I thought.

Miranda – the narrator – came naturally to me. She’s got a lot of attitude, which I like. And she’s not afraid to tell things how she sees them. I was not at all like her when I was younger, but I would’ve liked to be. She speaks her mind.

2. How do you feel about bringing famous authors and literary characters to life --- doing them justice? Who is your favorite to write?

Heathcliff is my favorite. He’s kind of like the ultimate strong and silent type. Second to him is Ernest Hemingway. He had a great sense of humor when he lived and a lust for life. He would’ve been fun to know, I think.

As for doing classic characters and their authors justice, I’m sure I fail miserably! But I do my best.

3. When in the process did you realize there would be more than one book? How did you outline the series, and did that affect the plot of the first book?

Well, from the outset, I knew there would be at least two books. My contract with MTV Books asked for two from the start. In that way, I knew I didn’t have to tie everything up neatly with the first book. Knowing you have a second makes things a little easier because you know you don’t have to end every storyline.

I didn’t know I’d have a third book, but I hoped I would. I really pushed for it so we could revisit the Heathcliff-Miranda-Ryan love triangle. At the end of the second book, Miranda finds herself on the outs with both of them. I couldn’t let her end up single! It just seemed wrong.

4. What were the most difficult and best parts of building the world of Bard Academy?

The most difficult part was trying to create an authentic high school setting and real characters. I’m pretty far from being a teenager, and I didn’t want to come across as an adult trying to pretend I was a teenager. I wanted a story that would resonate with younger readers. I asked the opinions of some younger cousins to help me keep it realistic. As for the best part, I would say that it’s a lot more fun writing about being a teenager than actually being one.

5. How did you make Miranda a likeable character when we met her in a sticky situation?

That was a tough line to walk. She had to do something bad enough that her parents would be justified in sending her to a reform school, but not bad enough that readers wouldn’t relate to her. I decided that if her biggest bad deed – wrecking her Dad’s car – was done because she was trying to do something selfless like help her sister, then she would be a little more sympathetic. Plus, with her divorced parents largely absorbed in their own problems, Miranda had to parent both her sister and herself. If she acted out, it was understandable.

6. What do you see as your greatest strength and your greatest weakness as a writer?

Hmmmm. That’s a tough one! I think I can probably answer weakness first. I tend to let myself rush to finish a book. Of course, “let” is one way of putting it – and “crunching under deadline” is another way. I often procrastinate, though, which means that I’m often sprinting to the finish. This doesn’t give me as much time to write carefully in those last chapters.

As far as my greatest strength, I suppose it’s my sense of humor. At least, that’s what my agent tells me. Of course, she’s biased.

7. Briefly detail your journey to publication after finishing your first book. (Finding an agent, an editor, promoting the book, etc.)

My first book was “I Do (But I Don’t)” and I sent out about a hundred query letters to agents. Most of them were soundly ignored. I only wish I had hundreds of rejection letters. Rejection letters are better than silence. A rejection letter at least means somebody bothered to read your letter!

But, I was lucky enough to get about five agents who wanted to read a few chapters, and of those two wanted to read the whole thing, and those two asked to represent me. A year later, my agent sold “I Do” to Simon Schuster and a year and a half after that it was finally published. The best advice my agent gave me was “don’t quit your day job yet” back when I signed that first contract. I was ready to march into my boss’s office. But I was lucky I didn’t. It was another year before I saw the first royalty check!

8. You also have an adult supernatural series Every Demon Has His Day. Can you tell us a little bit about this series? How did writing an adult series compare to writing YA?

Every Demon Has His Day was a fun book to write. It’s your not-so-typical Girl meets Demon story, where our heroine discovers she’s the Chosen One who must prevent the conception of the Antichrist. Her only helpers are the ghost of her useless almost-ex husband and a talking French Bulldog in a pink sweater. There’s also the wily and hunky ex, Sheriff Nathan Garrett, who doesn’t believe in anything supernatural, but does believe our heroine might be implicated in the murder of her almost-ex husband.

There are very similar challenges in writing adult books versus YA. You have to develop interesting characters and plots for both. I think the biggest difference is voice. But both adult and teen audiences want stories that resonate.

9. Your novel I Do (But I Don’t) was made into a lifetime movie. Can you talk about that experience?

It was really a fantastic experience. They did a great job adapting the story. I spent a very fun weekend on set, where I met Denise Richards and Dean Cain, who were both very nice. It was a very surreal experience, because they had director’s chairs with my character names on them (Lauren Crandell and Nick Corona). It was like I’d see my own characters walk over and sit down.

10. Which authors have inspired you the most?

I have so many authors I admire. Stephanie Meyer and Sarah Dressen are my favorite YA writers. I love the humor of Sophie Kinsella, Jen Lancaster and David Sedaris. Christopher Moore, Judith Merkle Riley and Charlaine Harris are probably my favorite supernatural writers. But my all-time favorite is probably Jane Austen.

11. You are stranded on a deserted island for five years. What five books would you want with you?

Oh, this is so hard! Pride and Prejudice (without the zombies), Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier, Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris, Tale of Two Cities (told you I was a lit nerd!), The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (only because I’m reading it now and I have to get to the end!), and I should probably break the rules and have a sixth book on how to survive on a deserted island, because I am hopeless when it comes to fishing, building huts or growing fruit.

12. And lastly, you are a USA Today best selling author, with a lifetime movie, multiple books, series and YA and adult fans. Basically, you are> awesome. What else do you want to accomplish?

Wow! Well, if my little girls both learn to say “please” and “thank you” that would be a great accomplishment. Other than that, I would just like to continue to write. Oh, and probably make it to the New York Times bestseller list. Or is that too greedy? Okay, I’ll just stick with the “please” and “thank-yous.”

Thank you so much Cara for stopping by and talking to the FNC!!!

To learn more about Cara check out her website

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

The Final Countdown

There are eleven days (count em) eleven days left in July and I have decided that within the next eleven days, I am going to finish my first novel (draft a bajillion technically, but draft 1 of this version).

I'm currently finishing up chapter 16 and I spent a good chunk of my writing time today revisiting the plot outline and at the moment it looks like I have 7 more chapters to write-which considering my writing output lately, is pushing it, but the last few chapters are pretty much already written from the original draft. So I think they will come out pretty easily.

This book is becoming more and more epic as the days go on. I am currently on page 354, which is crazy considering I have seven more chapters to write. If I stick to just seven and I write each at my average of twenty pages a piece, it looks like I am going to clock out on July 31 with a 500 page manuscript! Now how is that for my summer vacation since I started this draft on June 15th. Whew!

The extreme length of my manuscript is not lost on me. And I guess time will tell how much of a problem that is. I know we are definitely in the long end of the spectrum here, but considering the fact that this is a YA fantasy/romance, I don't think I'm too far off the norm. Of course I can always trim down the word count (a lot) but I'm starting to get nervous about that. I don't know why-it's an irrational fear. But I'm seriously worried about how to get this manuscript trimmed without losing the essence of what I created. In a way I kind of like how long it is. There is a part of me that loves to pick up a big meaty epic and know I'm going to get lost for a long time, or maybe a short time if it's a compulsive read, but the length still means I'll get lost.

I was asked over at Frankie Writes how to tell how you could tell how long a book should be, and I really don't have a good answer. I think every writer is different and every story is different and the only way to know for sure if its too long is if at any point you get bored with the story, find the story going nowhere, or realize you are reading scene after scene that does not further the plot or character development.

And I think plotting is the best way to avoid those types of issues. As long as you have a plot, a strong plot or at least a clear idea of where you are going, then it won't matter so much if your book is 200 pages or 600 pages, because you will be telling the story the right way.

If anyone else wants to jump in with a better answer or further this discussion feel free. But in the meantime I've got to use up the last few hours of day eleven...

Am I cheating?

Last night, I sat down to begin Chapter 12 (it's so exciting to say that, honestly), which is Maddy's first chapter since the big dramatic climax of the novel. So I began the chapter, and I figured I'd copy and paste the scenes from draft 2 of the unused Maddy version of Chapter 10, just so I could update them and flow them in more naturally. And I did. Imagine my surprise when two scenes and a couple random lines added up to just over 14 pages. Did I feel excited? You bet. But I also felt like a cheater (semi-ironic since my novel's title is Multiple Choice). I mean, I did the work, but I still felt like it was too easy. How could I have 3/4 of my chapter neatly handed to me? Of course I felt ridiculous, but it just proves how tough I've found the past 11 chapters.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to cleaning up what I copied and adding another five or so pages, then going back and adding another couple pages to Chapter 11. After that, I'll be swamped by moving for the next couple weeks, but I'm pretty confident that I can finish Chapter 13 (and quite possibly Chapter 14) by Labor Day weekend.

What does this mean? Ladies and gentleman, I might actually finish all 18 chapters of my novel before Christmas, just at the two-year mark. I may just be a fan of cheating.

Has anyone else had an awesome shortcut experience?

Coming Soon... Interview with Julie Kraut

FNC's happy to announce that in late July/early August we'll be posting an interview with Julie Kraut, author of the recently released Slept Away and co-author of Hot Mess, both from Delacorte. Like her books, Julie's a lot of fun, and many of the posts on her website are hilarious. Check her out at Her website also includes a list of her upcoming signings -- FNC will be stopping by to see her October 3rd at the University of Pennsylvania bookstore, so come meet us there and show your support!

Monday, July 20, 2009

Friday, July 17, 2009

Coming Soon...Interview with Cara Lockwood

Coming soon, we'll be posting an exciting interview with author Cara Lockwood. Cara is the author of both adult and YA fiction with lots of short stories. Her YA series Bard Academy, features Wuthering High, Moby Clique, and The Scarlet Letterman.
She also was featured in the anthology A New Dawn: Your Favorite Author's on the Stephenie Meyer's Twilight Series.
Check back soon for our interview with her. We're really excited!!!

Thursday, July 9, 2009

Hey, Writer Magazine Stole Our Idea!

Ok, just kidding. But you should totally check out the August 2009 issue of Writer, which has a great lead story: "Ins & outs of first novels," in which five first-time novelists answer wonderful questions like: "How did you know when the novel was done?" and "Describe how you found and worked with an agent." (None are YA authors, but I don't hold it against them!) 

As a side note: I've been subscribing to Writer for about a year now (I got a 2-year subscription), and I definitely find it a worthy buy, since reading it every month reminds me about craft and the finer points of good writing, so that midway through my novel I don't trail off into horrible blathering paragraphs with too many adverbs or something.

So go grab a copy!

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

She Writes

So yesterday my wonderful friend Darlene informed me about She Writes, a social networking site for women writers. It's new, so it's a little rough, but the creators want feedback. The response has been insane, too, with thousands of writers joined already. (I'm one of them!) So go check it out!

I spent July 4th weekend in Boston with Darlene, and now that I'm back I'm working on finishing up chapter 11 by Saturday morning so that the ladies can read it at Sunday's meeting. I've also been spending time working on the text for my high school's view book (a freelance marketing-centered project) and helping my family start packing, which has slowed me down. But I'm determined!

Lovely Boston fireworks:

And we wandered around Cambridge, and I saw this sign and felt compelled to take a picture. Seriously, I think I've been reading one too many vampire novels recently!

Sunday, July 5, 2009

Cheryl Klein, Getting At The Emotional Heart

Head on over to Cheryl Klein's Blog Brooklyn Arden for a really awesome post about getting to the emotional heart of your story. Cheryl has hundreds of great writing tips and plenty of talks you can check out at her website.

Hope everyone has had a productive weekend for writing, reading or just plain having fun!

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Coming in interview with Becca Fitzpatrick

I have some pretty exciting news...

This August we'll be posting an interview with debut author Becca Fitzpatrick, whose highly anticipated first novel, Hush, Hush will be released by Simon and Schuster this October!

If you haven't heard of Becca Fitzpatrick yet or Hush, Hush, you can visit her website here, and read a prologue and the first two chapters here. We're already hooked at the FNC and can't wait to read more, oh how we wish for ARCS...

More info will be coming soon!
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